Summer Dreamers Discover Downtown History

By Jasmine Fletcher and CampDEC campers/counselors

Pittsburgh has a lot of art and interesting buildings and places that people usually just pass by without noticing. That’s what 23 CampDEC (Design Explore Create) campers discovered during five downtown scavenger hunts. We were part of the Pittsburgh Public School’s Summer Dreamers Academy; the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation planned our afternoon camp from July 11 to August 10. We discovered Pittsburgh, not just as a city, but as a historic place.

Street names like Fort Pitt Boulevard and Fort Duquesne Boulevard clue you into the fight between the British and French in the 1750s for control of the land at the forks of the Ohio River. We even found French Street right near CAPA, where CampDEC was located. Forbes Avenue is named for the British General John Forbes who took control of this region from the French in 1758 and named Pittsburgh for William Pitt, the British statesman who planned the winning military strategy. Stanwix Street is named for the British general who oversaw construction of Fort Pitt, completed in 1761. Wood Street is named for one of the surveyors from Philadelphia who laid out the streets in 1784, at the request of the Penn family. The Boulevard of the Allies honors the soldiers who fought in World War 1. We were truly walking on history as we explored downtown.

We discovered the meanings of many different statues, murals, and sculptures. One of our favorite sculptures is on the corner of Seventh Street and Fort Duquesne Boulevard. It’s made out of all the different bridges in downtown Pittsburgh. Another favorite sculpture is the jazz musicians and dog on Liberty Avenue, across from the August Wilson Center for African American Culture. The mural of the two Andy’s on Smithfield Street near Strawberry Way is the weirdest thing many of us saw. PNC’s living wall at Fifth Avenue and Wood Street was voted the most favorite mural by CampDEC campers.

The most colorful building exterior in downtown Pittsburgh is Nola restaurant in Market Square. (CAPA, the Harris Theater, and Theater Square also have colorful exteriors.) The longest escalator, although it was being repaired, is in One Oxford Centre. The building with the most arches is the Allegheny County Courthouse. The following buildings got votes for the most spectacular interiors: Union Trust, Point Park University Center, Omni William Penn Hotel, Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel, and PPG’s Wintergarden, where Santa Claus’ from around the world are exhibited in the winter.

Our favorite water feature is the fountain in PPG Place and our favorite green space/open space is Mellon Green on Grant Street. The corner parklet has beautiful landscaping and a dramatic fountain in the center. For the best soft serve ice cream in downtown Pittsburgh, go to a sea-creature’s house in a square, or find where a “world” and a “strawberry” survive near “Smith’s field.”

We noticed some unusual things, too. There are fake Magnolia trees across from a plaza with “eyeball” benches. There is a “B Street” in Pittsburgh––but we never found an “A” Street. The City-County Building includes a statue of William Pitt, a plaque with all the words of the Gettysburg Address, and a painting of Abraham Lincoln holding the Emancipation Proclamation, plus elevator doors that illustrate our city halls and courthouses.

We would go out on days that were “hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk,” according to Caquan, because we were really determined to understand the history behind the city we lived in. We went out there to get connected to the city, to get deep into the history behind the famous “steel city.” Knowing more about the city makes us care about it more.

When we leave CampDEC, we will leave with a tremendous amount of knowledge. And, we’ll never just walk down a street again without noticing, looking up, finding “scars” that show how a building has changed over time, and reading the names of places and streets to figure out their meaning for Pittsburgh. We have learned to really evaluate what’s built because even the simplest details have a history behind them. Downtown Pittsburgh is a great place for scavenger hunts and explorations.

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Workshop: Window Restoration Series (Part 2)

Instructed by Jenna Vanden Brink, of The Union Project located in Highland Park, this  session will provide a demonstration of how to restore stained glass.

Stained glass is quite elegant and delicate. In this session participants will learn the proper techniques on how to restore these pieces art to their former glory. Union Project usually provides these workshops at their facility in Highland Park. We are excited to welcome them to the LHRC in Wilkinsburg.

The Union Project is located at 801 North Negley Ave., in the historic Second Presbyterian Church in Highland Park. They were pivotal in the $1.5 million restoration of the building, which included a stained glass restoration effort that lasted over two years, involved 1,300 volunteers and would have cost over $1 million dollars to complete. As a result Union Project designed a stained glass restoration program and has provided workshops to the Pittsburgh community since 2004.

This workshop is FREE

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Woodville Plantation: Above Stairs and Architectural Tours

Join Rob Windhorst and Jim Galbraith of Woodville Plantation as they take visitors on a behind the scenes tour of Woodville Plantation. This special event will focus on the unique architecture and development of the main house during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This event will be the only time in 2011 that the upstairs of the house will be open for tours.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rob Windhorst
412-221-0348
rwindhorst19@comcast.net

Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 pm.

Just 7 miles and 15 minutes south of Pittsburgh, Woodville is conveniently located 1/4 north of Interstate I-79 Exit 55 (Kirwin Heights Exit) on Route 50, near the intersection of Thoms Run Road in Collier Township. For further directions or for more information, please visit Woodville’s website at http://www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412-221-0348.

 

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Woodville Plantation: 18th Century Rout: Dinner and Dancing on the Lawn

Join the Nevilles for a fun evening of dinner and dancing on the lawn. Guests will enjoy food prepared from 18th century recipes. Participants will also be given the opportunity to learn and participate in 18th century dances, as live period music is performed. The cost of this event is $30 per person and includes food, drinks and dancing. The event is limited to first come first served, so register quickly.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rob Windhorst
412-221-0348

Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 pm.

Just 7 miles and 15 minutes south of Pittsburgh, Woodville is conveniently located 1/4 north of Interstate I-79 Exit 55 (Kirwin Heights Exit) on Route 50, near the intersection of Thoms Run Road in Collier Township. For further directions or for more information, please visit Woodville’s website at http://www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412-221-0348.

 

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Historic Roaring Run Farm on the Market (SOLD)

SOLD
In 2004, PHLF accepted a donated preservation easement on Roaring Run Farm located at 276 Roaring Run Road in Champion, PA. Now, the owner of the 52-acre farm that dates back to the early 19th century is hoping a preservation-minded person will become its new owner.

The property is located just a few miles from Seven Springs and the Donegal Exit of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, less than an hour from Pittsburgh. It includes a 1,600 square-foot house with three bedrooms, a separate double garage, a 40 x 50-foot bank barn and springhouse and is adjacent to a nature preserve and conservation district with an amazing view of the Laurel Highlands.

Persons interested in exploring the possibility of purchasing the farm are invited to contact Jeremiah T. O’Shea at 412-400-3371 or rorrunjto@yahoo.com. The asking price is $199,000.

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Backyard Composting – Housing Resource Center Event

See a demonstration on how to set up a compost pile, learn proper maintenance and ways of using finished compost.

Facilitated by Nick Schorr, Pennsylvania Resource Council

 

Contact:
Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 1-412-471-5808

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Thank You Spring and Summer Interns

Since March, PHLF has involved 15 students (high school, college, and graduates) in its educational programs and preservation activities. As volunteers with PHLF, each student decides how many hours a week and what days he/she is able to help out. Once here, interns assist with school tours, workshops for teachers, research and archival assignments, and main street programs. And, if they enjoy being with students, they help out with CampDEC, a 20-day adventure with middle school students in the Pittsburgh Public School’s Summer Dreamers Academy. Thank you everyone for your help and effort!

As a result of their experiences, interns add to their portfolios and gain a new (or deeper) appreciation for Pittsburgh’s architecture and history and for the economic, social, and cultural benefits of historic preservation. Intern comments on the value of their experiences include the following:

  • Julie Edwards: “PHLF has given me a deeper understanding of Pittsburgh’s extensive architectural heritage and a greater appreciation for the built environment.”
  • Alyssa Malobicky: “Thank you for welcoming me back to PHLF again. The hands-on involvement in the day-to-day activities of PHLF teaches me so much. I appreciate all that PHLF does to keep Pittsburgh a special place.”
  • Ashley Moore: “Through interning with PHLF, I have a new-found appreciation for Pittsburgh. It is amazing how evidence of the city’s changes was here long before I was and may be here long after I am gone.”
  • Barrett Reiter: “My experiences with the educational, non-profit portion of PHLF have taught me that educating future generations is as important as preserving the accomplishments of those past. Without understanding and a personal connection to the built environment our unique history is too easily lost.”
  • Shane Martin: “My time with PHLF has broadened my horizons on subjects ranging from historic preservation to urban design and the strenuous human effort put into the systems that hold our society together. I was fortunate to work alongside the very minds that ensure our city’s rich history and put forth my own efforts at planning the future.”

We thank the following 15 people (all pictured above) who volunteered their time and talent to PHLF:

  1. Lauren Borrelli, Penn State University (Architecture)
  2. Emily Bush, Miami University of Ohio (History/Journalism)
  3. Julie Edwards, Kent State University graduate (Interior Design)
  4. Michal Gould, University of Pittsburgh
  5. Stacy Litwinowicz, West Virginia University (Interior Design)
  6. Samantha Mabe, Clemson University (Architecture)
  7. Alyssa Malobicky, Virginia Tech (Landscape Architecture)
  8. Shane Martin, University of Pittsburgh (Urban Studies/Architectural Studies)
  9. Grace Meloy, University of Pittsburgh (Architectural Studies/Civil Engineering)

10.  Ashley Moore, University of North Carolina graduate (Masters of Urban Design)

11.  Barrett Reiter, University of Pittsburgh (History/Political Science/Historic Preservation)

12.  Katherine Schmotzer, Baldwin High School

13.  Emily VanBuren, Slippery Rock University––Masters (History)

14.  Camden Yandel, Saint Vincent College (Graphic Design)

15.  Sydney Zalewski, Carnegie Mellon University (Architecture/Photography)

To learn more about PHLF’s volunteer internship program click here.

 

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Penn-Liberty Cultural District Walking Tour

Explore Pittsburgh’s arts and entertainment district visited by more than one million people each year. Now designated a National Register District and a City Historic District, the Penn-Liberty area includes handsomely restored performance halls and hotels, and renovated commercial buildings housing galleries, schools, restaurants, one-of-a-kind stores, and residences.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny
Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation
marylu@phlf.org
412-471-5808, Ext. 527

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The Insider Guide to Wilkinsburg

Anne Caffee | Wednesday, July 27, 2011
Garden Dreams
Many in Wilkinsburg credit the Wilkinsburg Community Development Corporation for helping to drive this spirit of optimism. The WCDC was organized in 2007 to attract investors and entrepreneurs to its main commercial district on Penn Avenue. 

Its energetic and tenacious executive director, Tracey Evans, knows that Wilkinsburg’s success will be built brick by brick.  “We are working hard to lay the right foundation for a more successful business district,” she says. 

Evans, a 25-year resident of Wilkinsburg, is in her fifth year as an elected member of the borough council, and chairs the Wilkinsburg Municipal Authority and Wilkinsburg Borough Commercial and Industrial Development Authority. She started out as a freelance set designer for Pittsburgh stage productions, and got involved as a volunteer in a number of local restoration projects.  A graduate of Point Park University, her career in community revitalization took flight when she became the first executive director of the Wilkinsburg Community Development Corporation, which she helped found.

Now, in addition to overseeing the execution of a 6-year $1.8 million Neighborhood Partnership Plan for Wilkinsburg, funded by Tri-State Capital Bank and the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, and developed with input from the borough, residents, and the business community, the WCDC is deep in the first phases of Streetscape Improvement Program to revamp the Penn Avenue corridor.

Ray Appleby

The first phase of the Program’s investment has provided tree pruning, 80 decorative streetscape banners, and locally fabricated trash receptacles designed by Technique Architectural Products, whose owner, Ray Appleby, is a CMU-trained sculptor. (His shop has outfitted Mad Mex locations with some cool metal work).

A recent grant through TreeVitalize Pittsburgh and the Borough of Wilkinsburg will put in place 500 new street trees, all to be planted by Nine Mile Run Watershed Association and volunteers on public property.  A grant from Duquesne Light helped refurbish existing streetlights and create a well-lit and safer corridor while the Wilkinsburg Police Department has re-established a walking police presence along the business district.

“Our primary focus is crime and safety issues,” states Evans, “along with enforcement of building codes, loitering and littering laws. Our beautification work will also help attract business and investment back to Wilkinsburg.”

Some of Wilkinsburg’s old and architecturally gifted homes in the Hamnett Place neighborhood have been restored through the efforts of the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation (PHLF). Their Wilkinsburg redevelopment projects have successfully restored four homes in the Hamnett Place neighborhood; work on three more historic homes, and the two-building, 27-unit Crescent Apartment development, are scheduled for completion by the end of this year.

PHLF launched a housing resource center, and has cleaned and cleared vacant lots, “Initiatives taking place right now in Wilkinsburg total over $10 million,” says Michael Sriprasert, PHLF director of real estate.

Urban Homesteading: finding your match

For the socially progressive, frugal and urban-focused homeowner not afraid to get his/her hands dirty, Wilkinsburg is the right match: racially/ethnically diverse, close to the city and fuel-efficient: eight-minutes’ drive to downtown, close to urban programs and amenities and public transportation (access to the East Busway can get anyone downtown within 20 minutes) and within a fifteen-minute drive of four city neighborhoods, the Waterfront, and Monroeville. 

Wilkinsburg offers eye-poppingly affordable real estate for urban homesteaders and entrepreneurs who can spot an architectural gem beneath the overgrowth, and are willing to put in sweat equity to polish it up. (One business owner bought a parcel of land on a credit card).

Resident Chad Chalmers, an architect and member of the WCDC’s design committee,spotted a typical diamond-in-the-rough on an overgrown lot: six-bedroom, three-bath home with hardwood floors and 14 stained glass windows, which he and his wife Brigitte “fell in love with, and bought for a song,” and has spent five years restoring.

A new website provides up-to-date for rent/for sale listings in Wilkinsburg. The Borough and School District have developed a Tax Based Expansion Ordinance, which provides for tax compromise and tax abatement opportunities. Plenty of rehab and restoration programs stand ready to help homesteaders and investors who want in on the ground floor of an area poised for new growth.

But its biggest assets are long-standing businesses, some more than 30 years old, and a large number of robust and committed volunteers in its neighborhoods who care and dig in to run programs and restore neighborhoods.

Wilkinsburg Means Business

Downtown Wilkinsburg is five-block area along busy Penn Avenue (Pa. Route 8) and Wood Street that features unique businesses, residences, and historic and landmark architecture. What you won’t see are taverns and night clubs; Wilkinsburg has been legally dry since 1870. After the repeal of Prohibition in 1933 when liquor sales became a local option, residents voted to keep saloons out of Wilkinsburg. (Look for beer, tobacco, and soda, sold by the case on Penn Avenue’s Wilkinsburg Beverage Co.)

 

Louis and Mai Ling Oui

If you’re a fan of the Strip District, plan a visit to Pittsburgh Asian Market, a.k.a. Ou’s International, located on Penn Avenue, owned by Louis and Mai Ling Ou since 1981.  Their large collection of specialty groceries and produce features hard-to-find items for Asian, Hispanic, and African-American menus.

 

Valley Sales

Valley SalesValley Sales, a locksmith and key business on Penn Avenue in business since 1929, has an amazing wall display of hundreds of keys, both antique and modern. Owner Mary Blackburn remembers one customer who had just purchased a sweet 1967 Chevelle, and needed a key. She found one.

Matt’s Up-beat Records on Penn features current and hard-to-find soul, vintage Motown, hip hop, gospel, and jazz releases, along with DVDs and poster art.

Family-owned James Florist on Wood Street recently refurbished their store entrance and sign with a Pennsylvania “Main Street” façade grant. They’ve been providing posies for proms, weddings, funerals and family celebrations for more than a century. Step inside to see one of their favorite holiday store props: an antique horse-drawn sled in mint condition. 

Wilkinsburg has made a for itself in the urban farming/grow-your-own food movement with its new Hamnet Place Community Garden, leased to the community by PHLF (and each plot taken) and Garden Dreams, a certified organic farm and heirloom seed business.

 

Community Garden

Kenyon Jewlers

Kenyon Jewlers, in business since 1924, is where the owner, Doug Duffus, does restoration on antique pieces, can custom create a wedding ring, and repair most anything brought in. In other words, he runs the place the way jewelry stores used to be run: with knowledgeable people and masters of their craft.

Leah Thomas opened a ladies’ boutique, A Woman’s Touch, on  Penn Avenue seven years ago. Among fashionable church-going ladies in town, the sherbet-colored hats in her window never go out of style. This year, with a royal wedding spurring interest in stylish chapeaux, she had 150 to 200 new wholesale and custom-designed pieces on her racks. (*article in P-G:http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11107/1139441-314.stm#ixzz1SIxp8woG*) 

Leah Thomas

Representative of Wilkinsburg’s historic pride in its churches, St. James Catholic Church, a gothic beauty almost 150 years old. has a long-standing commitment to social justice, and is a member of the Pittsburgh Interfaith Impact Network (it was one of its founding members), and is the only Wilkinsburg-based church among the PIIN membership.

To read more about Wilkinsburg businesses see the Featured Neighborhood on our home page this week and click on Live. Work. Play. 

Captions: Garden Dreams; Louis and Mai Ling Ou; Valley Sales; Community Garden; Kenyon Jewelers; Leah Thomas.

Photographs copyright Brian Cohen

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Manchester Great House Sale and Tour

The Manchester Great House Sale and Tour is a follow-up event to the previous sale and tour in 2009. Manchester’s Great House Sale & Tour 2009, held Saturday and Sunday, October 17 & 18, 2009, was a marketing and operational success. During the tour 36 people put down deposits to purchase seven renovated properties and nine new construction models at Columbus Square upon completion. The 2011 house sale and tour will build on this success of the 2009 Tour.  This year, the event will saturate Pittsburgh and Allegheny County with positive images of Manchester and potentially attract up to 1000 people to the area over the weekend.

The 2011 Sale and Tour will feature both historic rehabilitation and contemporary new construction models. This event celebrates a joint venture between our Citizens Corporation, Fourth River Development, Landmarks Community Capital Corporation, Landmark Design Associates, Mistick Construction, Pittsburgh Urban Redevelopment Authority, United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Allegheny County.

This event features the seven buildings that were sold and renovated following the 2009 Sale and Tour. As a result, some houses came with $60,000 of instant equity many of designs employs a traditional neighborhood design concept, with most of the single-family residences containing a private yard and two-car garage. All Columbus Square residences feature cost-saving “green” energy components and offer floor-plan options suitable to individual owner needs. All of the homes will qualify for a City and County tax abatement program.

Located just minutes from the city’s commercial business district, Manchester has a rich and unique history.  This history is evident in both its beautifully-preserved residential  architecture and in the delightfully-woven stories of its people from generations past and present. Manchester’s Historic District has been on the National Register Of Historic Places since 1975.

The Manchester Great House Sale & Tour will be your opportunity to be on the ground floor of an amazing investment. Choose from an exciting mix of contemporary new construction and historic rehabilitation.

Tickets purchased during registration will be $35.00. Tickets purchased online before registration are $25.00

info@manchestercitizens.org

 

Held and Sponsored By:

Manchester is the gateway community to Pittsburgh’s Northshore.  Located just minutes from the city’s commercial business district, Manchester is a community with a rich and unique history.  This history, linked to that of Pittsburgh itself, is evident in both its beautifully-preserved residential architecture and in the delightfully-woven stories of its people from generations past, present and future.  Recognizing the wealth of magnificently-built, Late Victorian style homes, the Corporation sponsored the designation of [Manchester's] Manchester Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places and was so granted in 1975.


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Penn-Liberty Cultural District Walking Tour

Explore Pittsburgh’s arts and entertainment district visited by more than one million people each year. Now designated a National Register District and a City Historic District, the Penn-Liberty area includes handsomely restored performance halls and hotels, and renovated commercial buildings housing galleries, schools, restaurants, one-of-a-kind stores, and residences.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny
Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation
marylu@phlf.org
412-471-5808, Ext. 527

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Woodville Plantation Whiskey Rebellion Weekend: Whiskey Rebellion Day

Step back in time at Woodville Plantation, as this living history museum presents a special event to commemorate the Whiskey Rebellion.  On the weekend of Saturday, July 16, and Sunday July 17, visitors are invited to meet historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794.

Join the troops of the Fourth Sub-Legion as they make camp at Woodville Plantation. Experience 18th century military camp life and participate with the soldiers as they march and drill. Events of the day include tactical demonstrations, musket firing, marching and ceremonial drills.  Soldiers will discuss what camp life was like in the army of 1794.  Visitors will learn 18th century cooking techniques as Woodville’s cooks prepare dinner for the encamped troops.

Special hours for the event will be from noon to 5 pm, with a special admission price of $3 per person.

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:

Rob Windhorst
412-221-0348
rwindhorst19@comcast.net

 

Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 pm.

Just 7 miles and 15 minutes south of Pittsburgh, Woodville is conveniently located 1/4 north of Interstate I-79 Exit 55 (Kirwin Heights Exit) on Route 50, near the intersection of Thoms Run Road in Collier Township. For further directions or for more information, please visit Woodville’s website at http://www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412-221-0348.

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Allegheny River Bridges and Point State Park Walking Tour

This walking tour is a refreshing mix of city views from bridges and riverfront paths and parks. We’ll walk across the Roberto Clemente Bridge to the North Shore, where we’ll explore the riverfront path, waters steps, and war memorials. Then, we’ll walk across the Fort Duquesne Bridge to Point State Park, where we’ll go inside the Block House––Pittsburgh’s oldest surviving building. The tour will end outside the Fort Pitt Museum, which we encourage participants to explore on their own, at their own pace. Bring a water bottle and wear a sun hat and comfortable shoes! This is a family-friendly tour. 

The walk is on fairly level ground, although we will climb steps and walk up and down bridge ramps.

Where

Front of Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel
107 Sixth Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Ending Location

Point State Park

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Exterior & Interior Home Maintenance – Housing Resource Center Event

Learn techniques of maintaining the exterior and interior of your home to ensure future value and avoid costly bills and repairs.

Facilitated by Karen Hanchett, Home Improvement & Maintenance Expert

 

Contact:
Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 1-412-471-5808

 

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Woodville Plantation Whiskey Rebellion Weekend: Walking Lecture: The Events of July 1794

Step back in time at Woodville Plantation, as this living history museum presents a special event to commemorate the Whiskey Rebellion.  On the weekend of Saturday, July 16, and Sunday July 17, visitors are invited to meet historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794.

Woodville Plantation and the Scott Conservancy will team up to present a unique walking lecture titled, “The Events of 1794”. Join the soldiers of the Fourth Sub-Legion as they return to Bower Hill to discuss and re-create the fateful events of the Whiskey Rebellion, as they occurred in July of 1794. This unique event will include an encampment from 1 pm until 7 pm along the “Tom the Tinker Trail.”

Participants will experience camp life with cooking demonstrations, musket firings and tactical demonstrations. At 3 pm, a history walk will begin at the PA State Historical Marker on Bower Hill (near Kane Regional Center) and end at the Scrubgrass Run Trailhead.  The walk covers approximately one mile along the newly restored trails of the Bower Hill. Topics covered include the Battle of Bower Hill, the soldiers that participated in the battle and the Whiskey Rebellion.

The walk is free to the public. Following the walk, participants are invited to tour Woodville Plantation. Woodville Plantation will be open to the public on Saturday evening from 5 pm to 8 pm.

Admission for this special opening is $3 per person. 

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rob Windhorst
412-221-0348
rwindhorst19@comcast.net

Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 pm.

Just 7 miles and 15 minutes south of Pittsburgh, Woodville is conveniently located 1/4 north of Interstate I-79 Exit 55 (Kirwin Heights Exit) on Route 50, near the intersection of Thoms Run Road in Collier Township. For further directions or for more information, please visit Woodville’s website at http://www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412-221-0348.

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Penn-Liberty Cultural District Walking Tour

Explore Pittsburgh’s arts and entertainment district visited by more than one million people each year. Now designated a National Register District and a City Historic District, the Penn-Liberty area includes handsomely restored performance halls and hotels, and renovated commercial buildings housing galleries, schools, restaurants, one-of-a-kind stores, and residences.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny
Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation
marylu@phlf.org
412-471-5808, Ext. 527

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Fairbanks Feature: STOP! LOOK! LISTEN!— THEN GO!

James D. Van Trump Library | Frank B. Fairbanks Transportation Archive | Fairbanks Features

Showcasing a variety of materials located in the Frank B. Fairbanks Rail Transportation Archive

No. 10 Presentation

Fairbanks Feature: STOP! LOOK! LISTEN!— THEN GO!

Years ago, these three words––STOP! LOOK! LISTEN!–– were very common in schools across the country as safety lessons were taught on a regular basis. The burden for arriving safely was placed on the individual, as he or she went about on the public thoroughfares. Since railroad crossings and tracks were a common part of towns, this instruction for all ages or people was extremely necessary. Of course, not everyone paid attention to the seriousness of these rules, and many tragic accidents happened.

Even today, people are still playing the odds while sprinting across the tracks. Maybe it is time to re-teach some of these valuable safety lessons. Come to the Frank B. Fairbanks Rail Transportation Archive to see the following materials and so much more:

STOP!––Here are two books from our collection dealing with signals, and containing drawings, plans, and detailed yard layouts.

  • Tyer’s Patent Train Signalling Telegraphs, by Tyer & Company, Electric Telegraph Engineers and Contractors, 4th edition, 1873
  • Lewis’s Railway Signal Engineering (Mechanical), by J. H. Fraser, B. Sc., A.M. Inst. C. E., London, 1932

LOOK!––Here are three original safety posters from the 1920s and 30s.

LISTEN!

  • “A Private Rail Car,” Northern Rail Car introduces an unrivaled method for entertaining clients in a luxurious environment.
  • “Rock Island Rooster,” Muscatine, along the Upper Mississippi: the viewer can watch the rail line from atop the 1896 Government Bridge. The Railroad Development Corporation and Iowa Interstate Chairman Henry Posner III talk about how the project came to be and some of the challenges involved. These trips formed the centerpiece of “Riverway 2006,” celebrating the 150 years of the first bridge across the Mississippi.
  • “Penn Central,” Big, Black, Busy––and Bankrupt––not the glory years.
  • VCR tapes “Steam in the Andes,” “Broadway Limited,” and “Horseshoe Curve,” along with many others in our collection, provide rail history in audio and visual color spectacular.

THEN––Here are several articles and artifacts from the Fairbanks’ collection on signaling.

GO!––Here are two steam engine slides from our collection:

  • 9/5/60: Olin Machieson Rail, photos by the Saltville RR Station, Saltville, Va. 2-8-0 East Tenn. & Western North Carolina engine No. 11; built 1892
  • 5/20/61: West Portal Chicago Burlington Quincy Davenport to Dubuque Iowa, Iowa  Chapter National Railway Historical Society, Steam Ramble

The Frank B. Fairbanks Rail Transportation Archive is open by appointment on Wednesdays, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Use of the archive is free to PHLF members (one of the benefits!); non-members are assessed a $10 use fee.

The Archive is located on the fourth floor of The Landmarks Building at Station Square, in the offices of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation.

To schedule an appointment, email Judith Harvey: fairbanksarchive@phlf.org or contact Al Tannler (412-471-5808, ext. 515; al@phlf.org).

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Penn-Liberty Cultural District Walking Tour

Explore Pittsburgh’s arts and entertainment district visited by more than one million people each year. Now designated a National Register District and a City Historic District, the Penn-Liberty area includes handsomely restored performance halls and hotels, and renovated commercial buildings housing galleries, schools, restaurants, one-of-a-kind stores, and residences.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny
Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation
marylu@phlf.org
412-471-5808, Ext. 527

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Landmarks Organization to Set Up CMU Fellowship

Landmarks Organization to Set Up CMU Fellowship

By Tony LaRussa
PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, July 7, 2011

A local foundation that helps finance the preservation of historic structures will use a $25,000 grant to set up a fellowship program in community and economic development at Carnegie Mellon University.

The Landmarks Community Capital Corp., a subsidiary of the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation, received the grant from the PNC Foundation. The program will be established this fall at CMU’s Heinz College School of Public Policy and Management.

The fellowship will provide $4,000 yearly stipends for students to conduct research on projects of interest to Landmarks in low- to moderate-income communities, said Karamagi Rujumba, a spokesman for the organization.

The organization’s president said the fellowships will provide students studying public policy with “a great learning experience.”

“Through the Landmarks fellowship, students will get a chance to step out of the classroom, learn about our approach to community and economic development, and make a direct impact on the work we’re doing in neighborhoods and urban centers,” said Michael Sriprasert, president of Landmarks Community Capital Corp.

Sy Holzer, PNC’s regional president for Western Pennsylvania, said the fellowship program will “bring a fresh perspective to development across the region.”

 

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PHLF Celebrates Scholars at Luncheon

During a luncheon celebration on June 20, David Brashear, Chair of the Landmarks Scholarship Committee, welcomed scholarship winners and their parents and former recipients who were able to attend. This year’s winners are Jaela Wesley (Schenley), Christopher Guyan (South Fayette), Lisa Stabryla (Carrick), Anthony Chmura (North Hills), and Shane Fischbach (Allderdice).

In his remarks David said, “Know that you come from one of the very best places in the world. Know that you have grown up in a place where respectfulness and manners matter, where friendliness is a way of life, where humility is considered to be a positive trait, and where you are considered to be not only a member of the community but a member of a family.

“Pittsburgh has given you much that will help you become successful. You’ve received great educations, and you’ve grown up in a city and region rich in cultural and recreational diversions.

“We couldn’t be happier to welcome you to our scholarship community. We hope that you will come back and see us every year for this luncheon and we hope you will develop a lasting relationship with our organization and with Louise and her staff.”

Since 1999, PHLF has awarded 45 scholarships ($4,000 each, for book and tuition expenses only) to graduating high school students who have excelled academically, are active in their communities, and care deeply about the Pittsburgh region.

PHLF will be accepting Landmark Scholarship applications again in April 2012.

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Penn-Liberty Cultural District Walking Tour

Explore Pittsburgh’s arts and entertainment district visited by more than one million people each year. Now designated a National Register District and a City Historic District, the Penn-Liberty area includes handsomely restored performance halls and hotels, and renovated commercial buildings housing galleries, schools, restaurants, one-of-a-kind stores, and residences.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny
Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation
marylu@phlf.org
412-471-5808, Ext. 527

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HERITAGE SOCIETY EVENT — Sept. 14, 2011

The annual Landmarks Heritage Society Appreciation Event will be held on a Wednesday evening, September 14 at the Moreland-Hoffstot house in Shadyside. The Landmarks Heritage Society consists of individuals who have made an annual gift of $1,000 or more, and/or who have included Landmarks as a beneficiary of their estate plan or have made a planned gift. Each year the group is recognized at an architecturally or historically significant landmark.

The Moreland-Hoffstot house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is a City-Designated historic structure, and has a PHLF Historic Landmark plaque. It is one of only four remaining homes in what was known as Millionaires’ Row at the beginning of the 20th century. The house was designed by Paul Irwin in 1914. Its basic form, the Grande Trianon at Versailles, had been used by McKim, Mead & White in “Rosecliff” at Newport, RI.  Pittsburgh’s Trianon is a provincial model of the Newport house. The interior decoration of the house is in the same French Renaissance style so evident in the exterior composition and ornamentation.

The invitation-only event is underwritten by The North Shore Group at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney-New York, Alan Greenberg, Senior Vice President, Financial Advisor, and Matthew A. Thompson, CIMA®, Associate Vice President, Financial Advisor. The North Shore Group is dedicated to assisting families with implementing the most appropriate strategies to transition wealth to both their families and their philanthropic interests.

Persons making qualifying gifts through August 15th will be invited to the event.

For more information, please contact Jack Miller at jack@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext. 538.

Become a Heritage Society Member
Make a Quick & Targeted Donation Today.

 


 

 

 

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Old Allegheny County Jail Museum Self Guided Tour

A PHLF docent is on hand to tell you the story of the place. Completed in 1886 to the designs of Boston architect H. H. Richardson and in use until July 27, 1995, the former Allegheny County Jail was renovated between 1999 and 2001 to house the Family Division of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas. A portion of one of the cell blocks has been preserved as the “Old Allegheny County Jail Museum.” The Jail Museum was created through a grant from the Drue Heinz Trust to PHLF, in cooperation with the Allegheny County Juvenile Court and Curator Ed Urban, former Deputy Warden. The Jail Museum opened in 2005. Enter the Family Court Facility through one of two entrances. In both cases, you must go through security and NO cameras are permitted.

  • Either enter through the main Ross Street entrance.
  • Or, enter through the great courtyard arch on Fifth Avenue.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808, ext 527

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Woodville Plantation: Cookery Made Plain and Easy: Beet Pancakes

Join cooks at Woodville Plantation for a unique class. Participants will prepare an 18th century historic preparation methods, period correct ingredients and reproduction cookware.
Class will be held from 1 pm to 5 pm and is limited to 6 students.
Cost for the class is $20. Pre-registration is required.

Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 pm.

Just 7 miles and 15 minutes south of Pittsburgh, Woodville is conveniently located 1/4 north of Interstate I-79 Exit 55 (Kirwin Heights Exit) on Route 50, near the intersection of Thoms Run Road in Collier Township. For further directions or for more information, please visit Woodville’s website at http://www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412-221-0348.

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rob Windhorst
412-221-0348


 

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Grant Street Walking Tour: From Firstside to Liberty

Although named for a British Major who was disastrously defeated here by the French, Grant Street is downtown Pittsburgh’s grand civic boulevard. This walking tour will feature the full-length of Grant Street. You’ll stroll through two greenspaces––PNC Firstside Park and Mellon Green––and see major historic landmarks, recent skyscrapers, and several spectacular indoor spaces and views. Bring a water bottle and wear a sun hat and comfortable shoes! The walk is on fairly level ground.

Contact:

Mary Lu DennyPittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundationmarylu@phlf.org412-471-5808, ext 527

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Market Square Area Walking Tour

Redevelopment of the Market Square area is moving ahead, and key projects are incorporating historic preservation and “green” building principles. Private local developers, the City of Pittsburgh, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the preservation community have developed a plan that balances new construction with renovation. You’ll see Three PNC Plaza, Market Square Place, and Market at Fifth, plus two green spaces: Market Square, the city’s first public space, and PNC’s Triangle Park, the city’s newest.

Contact:

Mary Lu Denny
Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation
marylu@phlf.org
412-471-5808, Ext. 527

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Event to Highlight Wilkinsburg Preservation


Event to Highlight Wilkinsburg Preservation
Wednesday, June 22, 2011
By Patricia Lowry, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation will hold an open house at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Landmarks Housing Resource Center in Wilkinsburg, where staffers will talk about the preservation nonprofit’s ongoing projects in the borough.

Landmarks restored and sold four single-family houses in and around the Hamnett Place neighborhood in 2008. Now it’s restoring three more, on Holland Avenue and Jeanette Street, as well as two early 20th-century apartment houses, the Crescent (23 units) and Wilson (four units) buildings.

Last fall, Landmarks converted a one-story former Packard dealership at 744 Rebecca Ave. into its Housing Resource Center, creating meeting rooms for workshops. Landmarks will hold a workshop on exterior and interior home maintenance at 2 p.m. July 16 and one on backyard composting at 2 p.m July 30.

For Saturday’s free event, reserve by Friday by contacting Marylu Denny at 412-471-5808, ext. 527, or marylu@phlf.org.

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